Tag Archives: Ios

Rate And Review Pop Ups: Not As Devilish As You Think


As the Dungeon Keeper free to play clusterbomb of fuck continues to explode around us, a new controversy has arisen over the use of a rate and review pop up by EA. Asking players whether they’d rate the game 1 star or 5 stars, anyone who chooses the latter is sent to the app store of the OS they are using while the former are given a pop up that asks to email feedback or dismiss the box completely. As a result, players who have a bad experience are kept away from putting their review on the store.

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By the Book: How Swiftkey Perfected Their App Launch

For many a year, the joys of truly brilliant predictive text remained in the hands of Android users alone. Swiftkey, in my book the best third party keyboard in the business, had carved out an impressive paid audience in the Google Play wilderness by building an excellent product that evolved to include multiple languages, that helped users customise the input method to choose their style and that one upped rivals by taking their best features and adapting them.

But until January 2014, they lacked an iOS presence to call their own. As a result of Apple’s negative stance on third party applications playing around with their inbuilt features, Swiftkey had to labour outside of Apple’s walled garden.

That’s all changed with the launch of Swiftkey Note however. Utilising their magical typing tech within a notepad app, the company has managed to generate acres of coverage and the kind of visibility for their app that most developers launching for the first time could only dream of – including a place in the overall top 50 rankings in the US, UK, Germany and Italy on iPhone and iPad without spending a dime of UA money. While I have a long standing admiration for Swiftkey due to the employees I’ve met there and the long hours of usage I’ve gotten from their keyboards, there are some really clear lessons about launching an app successfully that it’d be remiss of me not to talk about it.

So I’ve decided to look in depth at the launch of their app and determine what exactly they did to make things go so swimmingly. A lot of it might seem like common sense but getting these simple things right could easily help you propel your own app into the launch stratosphere.

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Plants vs Zombies 2 And The Perils Of F2P Monetisation

plants vs zombies 2

Shuffling towards freemium failure

Making money on the App Store is tough. I know a lot of people who set out thinking that you can use it to turn a quick buck with a free to play game but that really isn’t the case. Even with a lot of knowledge and experience, it is more than possible for you to screw up your money making strategy to such an extent that it ends up being kind of embarrassing for all involved.

I’m mulling this over because of the high profile free to play failure from EA that’s currently brewing under our noses. Plants vs Zombies 2, despite a huge amount of promotion, hype and free chart topping success, is very much on the way to being a freemium fail as it struggles uphill to breach the all important top grossing charts that Supercell and King have effortlessly held for the past months.

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Paid vs Freemium: Why A Price is Sometimes Right

Freemium Xcom

Kicking ass $20 a go

With the freemium economic model up, running and making big piles of money, paying up front for apps has increasingly felt like an action of someone on the fringes of social acceptability. Like the uncool kid at school bringing Pokemon cards in a week after everyone else has stopped playing (note: definitely not me as I had an awesome deck, thank you very much), parting a set amount of money for an app has felt increasingly unfashionable of late.

Which is why the tale of Xcom: Enemy Unknown has warmed the cockles of my cold, corporate heart. With developers falling over themselves to offer their products for free before reeling back as much money as they can with IAP, makers 2K China looked at the product they were selling (essentially a full port of a console game), decided it was amazing and slapped what is now considered an expensive $20 price tag on it to make sure they got their money back.

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